Snore stopper - Snorgo

Snore stopper

 

 

Snoring can be defined as the harsh sound made when you breathe during sleep. It is caused by the soft tissues in the throat and nose vibrating. When snoring, your breathing may be partially or completely blocked. This can disrupt your sleep as well as your partner’s sleep. It isn’t surprising that you might therefore look for a snore stopper. This article will help you find one that is right for you and help prevent poor sleep. 

 

 

 

Why is snoring a Problem?

Not only is snoring disruptive but it is associated with the more serious condition of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (in USA sleep apnea) (OSA). Sleep Apnea (OSA) creates interrupted breathing, which can reduce the oxygen levels in your blood. This can lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. This condition is so serious that it increases the risk of death. Always seek professional medical help if you feel you are at risk of OSA. The NHS website is a great source of advice as to when to seek professional help such as your doctor.

While snoring can be a sign of a serious problem, it is one that is often viewed as a nuisance problem. Even then it can be a significant problem to both you and your partner. It can often be easily solved with the right advice or right snore stopper. Trying not to view it all as ‘normal snoring’ may be helpful and offer an improved quality sleep and a new lease of life.

 

 

Snorgo

 

Snorgo is the new solution of choice. It is an approved snore stopper that is safe and has been independently shown to be effective. It works by training the loose tissues of the pharynx and specifically the soft palate and thereby keeping the airway open and less floppy. This allows you to breathe easily and prevents snoring. Snorgo doesn’t rely on any plastic to wear at night and is highly effective for both men and women. It is very easy and quick to use and extremely good value.

 

 

Does Snorgo really work as a Snore stopper?

 

Yes, it does. It has been independently tested twice and with very similar results. Over 75% of snorers and their partners noticed marked improvements or complete stopping of snoring. 100% of people were happy to have discovered Snorgo and no one in trial could be convinced to give it back for cash.

The latest trial was supervised by The Health Innovation Agency NW who are part of The Academic Health Science Network – funded by the NHS to support UK businesses who are likely to have the health products of the future. They spotted the potential in Snorgo and its novel approach to this frustrating problem.

Please read “Is Snoring Bad for My Health?” to understand more about why this issue should be addressed.

 

 

What other Snore Stoppers are there?

In all our posts, we try to encourage lifestyle changes to support your snoring. These really can act as snore stoppers or treatment for your snoring. However, many people like the idea of using a product alongside making lifestyle changes. This can give you the best chance to stop snoring. So, what other products are available as snore stoppers and support a good night’s sleep?

 

 

Mouthpieces

Mouthpieces work by holding your lower jaw slightly forward. This creates more space in the airway and prevents snoring. They are fitted by taking an impression of your teeth or you can buy a ‘boil and bite’ model which you fit at home.

Mouthpieces are the most common type of snore stopper but have several disadvantages:

  • They can be uncomfortable to wear
  • You may need to try several before you find one that fits
  • They can cause jaw pain
  • Drooling can be a problem
  • You may not be able to wear them if you have dental problems such as loose teeth

 

Nasal Strips

Nasal strips are external devices which adhere to your nose. They work by lifting the sides of your nose and thereby opening the airway. This can reduce or stop snoring.

Nasal strips have several disadvantages:

  • If you have a deviated septum, they may not work
  • They can be difficult to keep in place
  • Some people find them uncomfortable

 

Nasal Sprays

Nasal sprays lubricate the airway and make it less likely to collapse and vibrate. This can reduce or stop snoring.

Nasal sprays have several disadvantages:

  • If you have a deviated septum, they may not work
  • They can be difficult to keep in place
  • Some people find them uncomfortable

 

Snoring pillow

Snoring pillows are designed to improve your sleep position and prevent snoring. Snoring pillowThey work by keeping you on your side or stomach, which prevents the tongue from falling back and blocking the airway. Snoring pillows have several disadvantages: They can be uncomfortable to sleep on and some people find them too hot. They also may not be suitable for all sleep positions.

 

Chin straps

Chin straps work by holding your jaw in a forward position. This prevents the tongue from falling back and blocking the airway.

Chin straps have several disadvantages:

  • They can be uncomfortable to wear
  • You may need to adjust them during the night
  • They may not be suitable for all sleep positions

Chin Strap

Mandibular Advancement devices as snore stoppers.

Other tools are out there to try and be snore stoppers. The commonest ones are generally Mandibular Advancement Devices (MADs). These are devices – usually plastic, that are worn at night in an attempt to push the jaw forward slightly (bringing the tongue forward) and therefore open the airway a bit. They have evidence but they require ongoing use as they don’t try to ‘treat snoring’ at its root cause.

 

 

Anti-snoring devices which attach to your teeth

These work by holding your lower jaw in a forward position. This creates more space in the airway and prevents snoring. They are fitted by taking an impression of your teeth or you can buy a ‘boil and bite’ model which you fit at home.

  • Anti-snoring devices which attach to your teeth have several disadvantages:
  • They can be uncomfortable to wear
  • You may need to try several before you find one that fits
  • They can cause jaw pain
  • Drooling can be a problem
  • You may not be able to wear them if you have dental problems such as loose teeth

As you can see, there are a number of different types of snore stopper on the market. Which one is best for you will depend on your individual circumstances.

 

 

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is really a treatment for diagnosed OSA and not snoring. Many people using this will have noticed a serious sleep disorder. CPAP is a treatment which involves wearing a mask over your nose and mouth. The mask is connected to a machine which pumps air into your lungs. This keeps the airway open and prevents snoring, meaning CPAP does save lives by its action but it isn’t always popular as it is a noisy machine and is often uncomfortable to wear.

 

Surgery

If other treatments have not worked, you may be referred for surgery, which is usually only considered as a last resort and is usually only recommended if you have OSA.

The most common type of surgery for snoring is Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). This involves removing the uvula (the fleshy protrusion at the back of the throat) and part of the soft palate. This is usually done under general anaesthetic and takes about an hour. The success rate for this surgery is about 50%.

Other types of surgery which can be considered are:

  • Radiofrequency ablation – this involves using heat to shrink the tissues in the throat
  • Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) – this involves using a laser to remove the uvula and part of the soft palate
  • Palatal implants – this involves placing implants in the soft palate to stiffen it and prevent it from vibrating
  • Base of tongue reduction – this is usually only considered if you have large tonsils. It involves removing part of the base of the tongue.

As with any surgery, there are risks involved which your surgeon will discuss with you.

 

 

Lifestyle factors to stop snoring

 

If you are looking for a snore stopper, Snorgo is the new solution of choice. It is an approved snore stopper that is safe and has been independently shown to be effective. It works by training the loose tissues of the pharynx and specifically the soft palate and thereby keeping the airway open and less floppy.

These include:

 

Stop smoking

Wstop smoking to stop snoringe are all aware that snoring isn’t good for you. Here is one more for your list. Smoking increases the risk of snoring. It appears to be caused by the toxins in cigarettes adding to the floppiness of pharynx (throat) tissue. This floppy throat tissue then vibrates, giving the snoring sounds, as you sleep.

 

Drink less alcoholStop drinking to stop snoring

If you drink a lot you may need to seek professional advice before cutting down on alcohol but we all know that alcohol can cause snoring. This is a common cause in those who only occasionally snore. If safe for you to do so, trying to avoid alcohol may well be helpful.

Lose weight

If you are overweight or obese then losing weight can reduce or stop snoring. Weight loss, especially around the neck area, has a direct link to these noisy nights.

Exercise.

Whilst exercising just before you go to bed isn’t usually advised – safe and appropriate exercise is recommended and does help your snoring. The benefit of this exercise is independent of any weight loss too, so it might be a double win if you can keep it up.

Mandibular Advancement devices as snore stoppers.

Other tools are out there to try and be snore stoppers. The commonest ones are generally Mandibular Advancement Devices (MADs). These are devices – usually plastic, that are worn at night in an attempt to push the jaw forward slightly (bringing the tongue forward) and therefore open the airway a bit. They have evidence but they require ongoing use as they don’t try to ‘treat snoring’ at its root cause.

 

 

Snore Stoppers conclusion

 

 

Snore stoppers do exist to stop or at least markedly reduce snoring. It is anice position if you can To prevent your snoring, we favour Snorgo – simply because it has been shown to stop snoring in people and not look like Hannibal Lector in the process. At only £35 (at the time of writing) this is a real bargain when you weigh up its plus points and all the evidence in its favour. Mail on Sunday LogoBeing UK designed, made and distributed is also fairly uncommon too. Snorgo is seen as so noval and inventive that it recently featured in The Daily Mail (scroll down). So, if you are looking for a snore stopper that really works, look no further than Snorgo.